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Photo as seen in Bustle

According to a study published in the Telegraph, 10 million Brits believe that New Year’s is the most depressing night of the year.

Psychologist Dr. Larry Kubiak says that when an opportunity to be reflective arises, there is the possibility of becoming more depressed, especially if one already struggles with depression. It’s important to note that feeling depressed and struggling with clinical depression are two different things. People can feel similarly, just someone who is diagnosed with depression might feel their symptoms heightened.

Since New Year’s Eve is often associated with partying, people feel stress and anxiety around this time particularly because of social norms and peer pressures.

New Year’s resolutions also could make one feel more depressed. Self-improvement resolutions make people who struggle with mental illness feel like they are inadequate, especially if they don’t live up to the standards they set. Even thinking about setting resolutions is difficult for people who struggle with depression because it requires energy, which people with this illness don’t have a lot of in the first place.

Make sure to set goals that are right and attainable for you. Try not to compare yourself with others. Try not to feel bad if you don’t make it to the party and know that if you have depressed feelings, you are not alone. Most importantly, if your depression worsens, make sure to reach out to someone who can help.

Research and main ideas from the article in Bustle

RESOURCES & TOOLS
Mayo Clinic: Tips for coping with stress, depression, and the holidays

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