Angst - What People Are Saying
Michael Phelps

The conversation surrounding mental health really hits home for me. Many people don’t understand how debilitating mental illness truly can be, and even more than that, how common it is, yet people are afraid to have the serious discussions about it. I welcomed the opportunity to be a part of ‘Angst’ to further the dialogue around mental health and to help people understand the impact anxiety has on our mental state and encourage people, especially kids, to ask for help.

Michael Phelps
@MichaelPhelps
Dr. Jerry Bubrick

In our world there is a stigma attached to mental health disorders. People see anxiety as a personal failing rather than a medical condition; they see it as something to be ashamed of, rather than something to be treated. In reality, anxiety is universal. It doesn’t discriminate — and it’s very treatable. We just need to acknowledge it and talk openly first.

Dr. Jerry Bubrick
Senior Director, Child Mind Institute
Dale Chihuly

As a child I faced some very painful experiences growing up in a family suffering from mental illness and addiction. I had a number of close family members who were afflicted; we were all affected. There was little knowledge, understanding, or support for me as a child and for our family around mental illness. Admitting the problem, getting an accurate diagnosis and getting appropriate treatment whether with medications and/or therapies in the 60's and 70's seemed beyond reach. Years later, after doing a lot of work, getting consistent support for myself and understanding the impact of mental illness and addiction in my life, I was able to be a better partner to my husband, a better mom and a more compassionate friend. We were able to find tools for maintaining a more stable life with family, friends and fulfilling work. In breaking down the stigma and sharing our story, we feel more at peace, liberated from the shame and fear of being different and isolated. It is so important that we all begin to find the courage to articulate and share our stories. In sharing our pain and angst, we open ourselves to the love, support and acceptance of other caring individuals. No child or adult should suffer alone. We know that the movie "Angst" will encourage people to open up and take that next life giving step toward mental health.

Leslie Chihuly
www.chihuly.com
Lynn Lyons, LICSW

Angst is a touching and honest look at how anxiety impacts teens and their families. The message of the film, spoken loudly and clearly by teens, parents, and experts, normalizes the struggle and offers hope with its focus on the value of connection, openness, and family support. Why is anxiety the most common of mental health issues among our youth? This film asks us to look directly at our stress-filled culture and what must do to better support our young people.

Lynn Lyons, LICSW
lynnlyonsnh.com
playingwithanxiety.com
(603) 225-4147
Dale Chihuly

I’ve struggled with depression for most of my life. It was only around the age of 50 that I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. My close friends and colleagues were aware of my mood changes, and I discussed it openly with them. But more recently my wife and I decided that given the challenges we had faced, the information and support we were lucky to find, and the perspective we had gained from dealing with this disorder over time, perhaps we could share our story with more people so as to provide some hope and perspective.
Bipolar disorder is part of who I am as a person, an artist, a husband and a father. When I learned about "Angst", a movie that focuses on young people sharing their own struggles with anxiety, I was so taken by their honesty and courage. This movie’s goal is to create conversation and shatter the stigma around mental illness. It’s a powerful film, and it’s going to do good in the world.

Dale Chihuly
www.chihuly.com