Resources

We know anxiety can cause you, your loved ones, and your friends a lot of stress. Here are some of the resources we believe can help. This list has been examined by experts in the mental health field and is updated periodically. Please note these are just recommendations, and not “one size fits all”.

If you or someone you know is feeling anxiety it’s important to tell a family member, friend, teacher or counselor. Reach out to someone who can help, call 911, or any of the numbers listed below.

24 Hour Suicide Prevention Hotline

1-800-273-TALK (8255)

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

Crisis Text Line

Text 741741 from anywhere in the USA to text with a trained Crisis Counselor.

Crisis Text Line is free, 24/7 support for those in crisis.

Your best friend. Your dad. That lady down the street. That quiet kid in school. That loud kid in school. That dude in accounting. Your cousin in Alaska. That hipster in the flannel in Brooklyn. That rando who might lurk online. Crisis Text Line is for everyone.

Quick Tips for Dealing with Anxiety

You have just walked in the door at home, to a loved one who is clearly struggling with Anxiety. What do you say? How do you help them?

  1. Be Specific. Ask your loved one to describe in detail what it is that is causing them to feel anxious or overwhelmed. You could say, “Tell me more about what you were thinking about when you noticed you were stressed…” or “What part of today made you the most anxious?”  The more detailed, the better.  This allows us to de-catastrophize our emotion, and break it into more manageable compartments.
  2. Distract. Ask your loved one what dress they liked best at the Oscars, if they have eaten of the new restaurant, or discuss new music you’ve heard.  The actual topic is less important than the method. This gives pause to our emotional brain (Amygdala), and allows us to engage our frontal lobe, reaching into a more logical and sequential type of thinking.  Keeping our emotions regulated and our thoughts more rational.
  3. Don’t Isolate.  When we feel emotionally overwhelmed, our natural inclination is one of survival; meaning, we fight, flee or freeze.  If you notice your loved one isolating for any extended period of time, entice them to engage with others.  Go for a drive, a walk, see if they would like to cook something together.  At the very least, sit with them in their vulnerability. Engaging in intimate and vulnerable dialogue, albeit uncomfortable, is ultimately what will allow us the opportunity to be liberated from our fear.

Learn How to Recognize and Help a Teen in Crisis

The Insight Timer Meditation App

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

24-Hour Suicide Hotline
1-800-273-TALK (8255)

Crisis Text Line

Text 741741 from anywhere in the USA to text with a trained Crisis Counselor.

Crisis Text Line is free, 24/7 support for those in crisis.

Your best friend. Your dad. That lady down the street. That quiet kid in school. That loud kid in school. That dude in accounting. Your cousin in Alaska. That hipster in the flannel in Brooklyn. That rando who might lurk online. Crisis Text Line is for everyone.

National Alliance on Mental Illness

This is a comprehensive website and national organization. There is an app (on the website) and national crisis hotline.

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

Anxiety Disorders

Parents Can Learn How To Prevent Anxiety In Their Children

How to Recognize and Help a Teen in Crisis

Behavioral Health Treatment Services Locator

Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance

Many Minds Collaborative

Together We Can Make it Better. Improving mental health care is a complex challenge that no entity can meet alone. That’s why we created Many Minds Collaborative. We are mental health leaders, providers, non-profits, educators, government officials and philanthropists who have joined together.

Books:

Getting to Calm, The early Years: Cool-headed Strategies for Raising Caring, Happy, and Indepenedent 3-7 year Olds